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January 30, 2009

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Matthew Gartland

Hi Drew:

I've been educating myself on the SIT method via your LAB series. It's apparent that these tools are incredibly powerful and amazingly flexible. I have a pragmatic question - how does one judge the most appropriate tool (Multiplication, Subtraction, Task Unification, Division, Attribute Dependency) to use for a given situation? Is it best to apply just one tool or a combination of tools?

Cheers!
Matt

Matthew

You seriously want a kindle to be a remote control? I think that type of "innovation" is a bit over kill. I do not want a reading device to entice my children to watch more television! ;)

b

the classic jokes - i would love the kindle to fly my eggs and blew my coffee, is it called innovation? idea is cheap or maybe i just dont get it.

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About This Blog

  • For thousands of years, inventors have embedded five simple patterns into their inventions, usually without knowing it. These patterns are the "DNA" of products that can be extracted and applied to any product or service to create new-to-the-world innovations. Drew Boyd shares how to use this effective, repeatable, and trainable innovation process for organic growth.

Innovation Sighting

  • "Innovation Sighting" is a monthly feature that demonstrates the use of structured innovation methods. A great way to develop one's skill at innovation is to be able to recognize the use of templates in everyday products and services.

Marketing Innovation

  • "Marketing Innovation" is a monthly feature that demonstrates innovation templates for advertising, promotion, and integrated marketing communication. It is based on the pioneering work by Professor Jacob Goldenberg and his colleagues in "cracking the advertising code."

Academic Focus

  • "Academic Focus" is a monthly feature that highlights an institution or professor who is doing an outstanding job bringing the tools and skills of innovation to the practitioner community.

The LAB

  • The LAB is a regular feature that demonstrates how to use innovation methods and tools. Blog readers are invited to pose a question or submit a product or service for The LAB . Drew will then show how to apply a systematic process to the product or service and create real, new-to-the-world concepts.